The week of May 8, 2017

Essential Question: How can I look historically at something?

Agenda: This week, and the first part of next, students are researching a topic they find interesting. Students will either write a formal research paper or create a slide show to present next week, according the following parameters:

Past, Present, & Future Project

  • · Title slide required with name, date, and topic
  • · Explore past ~100 years to now and provide 2 interesting, researched facts
  • · Explain present state of topic and provide to 2 interesting, researched facts
  • · Based on experts, predict the future 50-100 years from now
  • · Oral presentation minimum 3 minutes
  • · OR write a research paper with a works cited page
  • · Either one is due May 17
Students have access to Google Classroom on Chromebooks for the rest of the week.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: This week we are studying the Vietnam Conflict and examining the U.S. military's role in creating more peaceful race relations between soldiers than in previous wars.

Homework: Answers to the African Americans in Vietnam handout questions are due Thursday, April 27, in complete sentences on notebook paper.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: Today we review the events of the Cuban Missile Crisis, add it to out timeline, and begin a cartoon analysis of a cartoon dealing with the end of the crisis.

Homework: Select one cartoon from either side of the page handed out in class and write a five-paragraph essay where the paragraphs should be written as follows:
  1. Introduce the topic of the Cuban Missile Crisis
  2. Describe one cartoon in great detail
  3. Explain the message or meaning of this cartoon
  4. React to the message of this cartoon
  5. Conclude the essay
Essays are due at the beginning of class, next Monday, April 24. One of the cartoons is posted below.
Download file "2372671_orig.jpg"

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: We are looking at the Cuban Missile Crisis and examining bias in some political cartoons drawn during and after this event.

Homework: None. However, students should take an opportunity to make sure they have the following events on their Cold War timeline with captions when necessary:

  • Military Desegregation
  • the Korean War
  • The Murder of Emmett Till
  • The Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • The Little Rock Nine and the Integration of LRC High School
  • The Launch of Sputnik
  • Every Cold War Presidential Administration
  • EXTRA CREDIT: The Reign of all Soviet Leaders

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: We are looking at the summer of 1961 when Freedom Riders were fighting for civil rights by risking life and limb to ride the interstate busses in the South to desegregate them.

Homework: none

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: Today we define the phrases, "FIrst, Second, and Third World" to understand how the world was divided at the end of WWII. We also examine the origins of the Korean War.

Homework: Fix or adjust your timeline if your received an unsatisfactory grade. Otherwise, none.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Essential Question: What happened during the Cold War?

Agenda: Today we discussed the primary concerns of the Cold War presidencies in terms of foreign and domestic policy. America had to stay a step ahead of the Soviet Union and we had to deal with issues of Civil Rights here at home.

Homework: Students need to set up a timeline of the Cold War and the presidential administrations during this time, from Truman to Reagan. Students need to use a 12" x 18" piece of drawing paper (supplied in class) and label the years between 1945 and 1990 and identify when each administration began and ended. Timelines should be ready by the start of class tomorrow.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Essential Question: Why did the Holocaust happen?

Agenda: After WWII, Nazi leaders were tried for war crimes during the Nuremberg Trials. For the past week, we have looked at the experiments of Stanley Milgram and others, to identify the root causes of Nazism.

Homework: Where Do Nazis Come From?

  • Create an evidence-based argument that explains how difficult or easy it seems to be to turn an ordinary human being into a racist, violent, Nazi.
  • Use the results of at least two psychological experiments as evidence; these can include Jane Elliot’s “A Class Divided” lesson, Stanley Milgram’s “Obedience to Authority” experiments, or Philip Zimbardo’s infamous “Stanford Prison Experiment”.
  • Create an introduction and a conclusion for this essay.
  • Essays will be assessed according the Write Traits of Ideas and Organization
  • For extra credit: Explain what we can or should do based on this evidence, to prevent another Holocaust.

Essays are due Monday, March 27, 2017

Friday, February 3, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today is the final day devoted to preparation for the WWII Interview Project. Students should have a set 5-7 questions on the lined side of the a 5" x 8" notecard with their psuedonym and role written above the red line. Their name, date, class and period should be on the blank side.

Homework: Students should ask others to read the questions while they extemporaneously answer them within a 2-3 minute period. Taping begins Monday/Tuesday next week, due to PARCC testing schedule.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: For classes that meet today, time will be given to research for the WWII interview project.

Homework: A quiz for chapter 7 of Four Perfect Pebbles is due tomorrow. Students should be ready to be interviewed as someone connection to WWII, based on research, answering questions they themselves prepared for 2-3 minutes. Taping begins Monday.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we watch the History Channel's "Modern Marvels: The Manhattan Project," the story behind the development of the world's first nuclear weapons.

Homework: WWII interviews begin taping next week. Create a notecard with several questions you will be asked in front of a live, studio audience.


Week of February 20-24

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: We spent the first 2 and a half days watching the 1995 movie, The Tuskegee Airmen. This was in part to help us understand how an actor can take on a persona and become another person. The rest of the week, we worked on preparing for the WWII Interview project, where students transform into someone associated with World War II.

The parameters for this assignment are as follows:
  • Interviews must be based on research
  • Interviews must connect to WWII in a meaningful way
  • Interviews must last 2-3 minutes
  • Interviews will take place during the week of March 6-10
Homework: Students are encouraged to continue researching at the Urbana Free Library or the Internet on their own.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we discuss the WWII Interview project. Starting Monday, March 6, students will conduct a live 2-3 minute interview as someone associated with WWII (Roosevelt, Mussolini, a fighter pilot, a WAC, Rosie the Riveter, a G.I. in the the Pacific...) based on research. Students should prepare a set of questions that they will answer in character.

Homework: Battle of the Atlantic packet due Tuesday, Feb. 21. Start thinking of who you want to research from WWII for the WWII Interview project in 2 weeks.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Agenda: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we take a similar assessment to the one we took last week, using notes and information generated in class.

Homework: Students should turn in the open-book quiz on Chapter 6, "On the Death Train" of Four Perfect Pebbles for Monday if they did not finish it in class.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we look at the work of one of America's most famous propagandists, Dr. Suess. We practice a little game of show and tell where each student shares a different cartoon written by Dr. Suess during WWII. Students Identify important details in the cartoon, and state its overall messge.

Homework: none

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Essential question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we watch A&E's Foot Soldier: World War II, to get a larger perspective on WWII. Students should answer question on a worksheet as they watch.

Homework: none

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we go over the quiz we took Monday over the timelines we are working on.

Homework: Finish the chapter 5 quiz for Four Perfect Pebbles tonight for homework.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we look at the tragic fate of Jewish passengers on the St. Louis, trying to escape Nazi Germany, only to be rebuffed by Cuba and the United States, sending the doomed ship back to Germany. Such attitudes seem to mirror the president's own agenda, as immigration of Muslims from selected countries has been suspended by executive order. We also take a brief open-note quiz on events we have studied so far.

Homework: Please read chapter 5 of Four Perfect Pebbles for Wednesday.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we commemorate National Holocaust Observance Day by watching the documentary based on diaries of teenagers during the Holocaust, "I'm Still Here," today.

Homework: none

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Essential Question: What was WWII all about?

Agenda: Today we look at the events of the mid-1930's through the eyes of FDR. Students assume the role of FDR, and based on real scenarios, have to predict what course of action Roosevelt actually took. Then students have 15-20 minutes to complete the chapter 4 quiz for Four Perfect Pebbles. If they cannot finish in class, it should be considered homework and turned in first thing tomorrow.

Homework: Chapter 4, "Escape to Holland," of Four Perfect Pebbles for tomorrow, unless completed in class. Reviews/reflections on The Great Dictator are due tomorrow as well (explain your feelings about the film using examples from the film).
Download file "Escape to Holland.docx"