Friday, December 8, 2017

Essential Question: How did WWI end:

Agenda: Students will look at Articles 42, 45, 51, 119, 160, 231, 232 of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles to write an evidence-based argument (EBA) on the fairness of the this treaty. Imagine you are President Woodrow Wilson and evaluate 2 major reasons why you think this treaty was fair or unfair to both Germany and France.

Homework; Please complete the EBA that you began today for Monday. WWI poem due next Friday.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Essential Question: How did WWI end?

Agenda: Today we discuss at length the poetry assignment due Dec. 15. Then we turn our attention to the Treaty of Versailles, which officially ended the war in 1919.

Homework: WWI poem due Dec. 15

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Essential Question: How was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we look at propaganda used during the First World War. Students will identify the audience, message, and rationale for various posters.

Homework: WWI poem due Friday, Dec. 15.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Essential Question: How was WWI fought and why did the U.S. join?

Agenda: Today we look at Germany's use of unrestricted submarine warfare, the sinking of the Lusitania, and the Zimmerman telegram.

Homework: A final draft, written in ink of an 8-poem specifically about WWi, using rhythm and rhyme is due Friday, December 15.

Monday, December 4, 2017

Essential Question: How was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we look at the use of airplanes in WWI. The class will look at archival photos of early airplanes and watch clips from History Channel's "The First Dogfights".

Homework: An 8-line poem (or longer) poem employing rhythm and rhyme specific to World War One is due in ink on Friday, Dec. 15.

Friday December 30, 2017

Essential Question: How was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we look at trench warfare through a reading and video clips.

Homework: An 8-line poem (or longer) poem employing rhythm and rhyme specific to World War One is due in ink on Friday, Dec. 15.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Essential Question: Why was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we go over and correct the Kid's Discover: WWI study guides from yesterday.

Homework: An 8-line poem (or longer) poem employing rhythm and rhyme specific to World War One is due in ink on Friday, Dec. 15.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Essential Question: Why was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today students will read "Kid's Discover: World War One" and answer short questions on a study guide.

Homework: Start thinking about a topic dealing with World War One to create a poem of at least 8 lines containing rhythm and rhyme due Friday, December 15.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Essential Question: Why was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we examine the origins of World War One historically and geographically. Students will walk through the events that started the 20th century's first major war and create a color-coded map of the European landscape upon which the bulk of this war was fought.

Homework: none

Monday, November 27, 2017

Why was WWI fought?

Agenda: Today we conduct a simulation of the origins of the first world war, where students develop an understanding of how colonization, industrialization, and militarization contribute to world domination.

Homework: none

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Essential Question: Was the U.S. imperialistic?

Agenda: Today we look at the origins of the Spanish-American War.

Homework: none

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Essential Question: Was the U.S. imperialistic?

Agenda: Today we look at Puerto Rico and how it came to be a U.S. territory, along with a study of the countries of Central America and the Caribbean.

Homework: none

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Essential Question: Was the U.S. imperialistic?

Agenda: Today we look at America's acquisition of Alaska and Hawaii. How and why did these states come to be part of the U.S.? Students will follow a class discussion based on the History Alive textbook.

Homework: none

Monday, November 13, 2017

Essential Question: Was the U.S. imperialistic?

Agenda: Today we look at America's acquisition of Alaska and Hawaii. How and why did these states come to be part of the U.S.? Students will follow a class discussion based on the History Alive textbook.

Homework: none

Friday, November 10, 2017

Essential Question: Is the U.S. imperialistic?

Agenda: Today we not only discuss and celebrate Veteran's Day, but we conclude out notes about how Alaska and Hawaii came to states.

Homework: none

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Essential Question: Is the United States imperialistic?

Agenda: Starting with Mark Twain's famous short story, "The War Prayer", we begin to look at America's involvement with war. First, we develop an understanding of the term imperialism and the annexations of Alaska and Hawaii by the U.S.

Homework: none

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Essential Question: Did the Industrial Revolution create more problems than it solved?

Agenda: Today we test our knowledge of facts and events of the Industrial Revolution, with an open-note, open-seat, talking aloud, clicker quiz.

Homework: none

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Essential Question: Did the Industrial Revolution create more problems than it solved?

Agenda: Today we review important concepts and ideas for an open-note, open-seat, talking aloud, clicker quiz on the Industrial Revolution tomorrow.

Homework: none

Monday, November 6, 2017

Essential Question: Did the Industrial Revolution create more problems than it solved?

Agenda: Today we look topic of climate change as a result of the Industrial Revolution, and examine the bias in several political cartoons about this subject.

Homework: American clothing essays are due tomorrow.

Thursday and Friday, November 2-3, 2017

Essential Question: Did the Industrial Revolution create more problems than it solved?

Agenda: Today we begin research on the topic of where the clothes Americans wear are made. Are there parallels between modern factories in other countries, including China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Honduras, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, and Haiti, and New York's Triangle Shirtwaist Factory of just over a century ago?

Students will write a 5-paragraph essay that addresses this question according the following guidelines:

  • Paragraph 1: Introduce the question of where American clothes are made and why.
  • Paragraph 2: Recount the story and conditions of the Triangle Factory, using the History Alive text or PBS's "The American Experience: The Triangle Fire"
  • Paragraph 3: Recount the story of at least one foreign factory located in a country above, using at least one article from the Internet. This (or these) article(s) must be cited at the end of the essay.
  • Paragraph 4: Compare and/or contrast the two stories.
  • Paragraph 5: Conclude this essay by suggesting why Americans no longer make most of their clothes.
  • Cite any articles you used at the end of your essay.
Homework: Essays are due Tuesday, November 7, but only today and Friday will class time be exclusively devoted to this project.